How Do Other Countries Spoil Mom on Mother’s Day?

When my husband and I got married, I knew we would be living over 8,000 miles away from my family, back in the 1980s keeping in touch was not easy.

The person I missed most was my mom. I managed, however, to keep our relationship close and lines of communication open, but since I lived 25 hours away from her, and, at the time, with a small family, and no funds to visit regularly, I missed a lot of special moment with her.

I am originally from Mexico, John from England, but when we got married, John was working in Australia so we started our married life and family in Melbourne, leaving our families far behind.

Living in different parts of the world, allowed me to experience how Mexico, Australia, USA and England celebrate Mother’s Day.

As many parts of the world are preparing to celebrate it, I thought it was a good idea to share the tradition of each of these countries, and how you can spoil mom if she is in any of these countries:

Mother’s Day In Mexico

Mexicans celebrate Mother’s Day slightly differently from the rest of the world.  “Día de las Madres” is always on the 10th of May. It is one of the biggest days of the year.

Perhaps, the most distinctive tradition of Mother’s Day is that children gather outside their mother’s homes, they hire trios or mariachi musicians in the early morning hours to serenade their mom, with the sweet melody of “Las Mañanitas.

Las Mañanitas.

When a Mexican mom listens to this song, she becomes very emotional.

Many families attend a mass, honouring the Virgin of Guadalupe, who is the symbolical mother of Mexico. After worship, the whole family visits and spends the entire day celebrating with Mom.

Schools organise special programs, singing or performing a traditional Mexican dance. Children make handmade gifts and cards especially for her at school.

If the 10th of May falls during the week, most employees have the day off.

Breakfast, dinner or supper in a restaurant is typical. For those who don’t reserve ahead of time, they bring food to their mother’s home and enjoy a meal together as a family.

If the children can’t be home on Mother’s Day, they make sure they contact her to let Mom know that she’s loved.

Mother’s Day in Australia

Mother’s Day is always on the second Sunday in May, the date itself can change from year to year.

Australian show their gratitude by thanking and honouring their mum. They express their appreciation by sending gifts, fresh flowers, a gift basket or plenty of other ways as a beautiful way to show their love.

Children take her for lunch or dinner in one of her favourite restaurants. If it a beautiful day, they spend quality time with mum in the fresh outdoors with a home-packed picnic in the greens, or visit her at home and make her feel special.

In 2019, the Mother’s Day Classic will be held in all capital cities and major metropolitan and regional locations across Australia.

The Mother’s Day Classic is an annual fun run of a 4km walk, 4km run, 8km walk, 8km run to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research.

A fun, healthy and inspirational event that brings the community together on Mother’s Day to support and remember those touched by breast cancer.

Celebrating Mother’s Day in the US

In the US like in other countries, Mother’s Day is on the second Sunday in May. It recognises mothers, motherhood and maternal bonds in general, as well as the positive contributions that they make to society.

Many people send cards or gifts to their mother or mother figure or make a special effort to visit her. Mother’s Day gifts are flowers, chocolate, candy, clothing, jewellery and treats, such as a beauty treatment or trip to a spa.

Some families organise an outing for all of their members or hold a special meal at home or in a restaurant. In the days and weeks before Mother’s Day, many schools help their pupils to prepare a handmade card or small gift for their mothers.

The American Mother’s Day does not have religious connotations and was formally established by President Wilson in 1914 after a campaign was launched by an American woman from West Virginia named Anna Jarvis, whose own mother died in May.

Following the campaign, President Wilson formalised the date, declaring it a “public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country”.

However, Jarvis is thought to have disapproved of the subsequent commercialisation of the holiday, which she felt overtook its sentimental origins. She even said she regretted starting it and at one point, sought to abolish it.

Mother’s Day in March in the UK

In the UK, Mother’s Day is formally known as Mothering Sunday. It takes place on the fourth Sunday of Lent and was traditionally a day on which Christians were encouraged to visit their “mother church”.

Workers would be given the day off to return home and worship with their loved ones and have family reunion.

It is thought that the return to the ‘mother’ church led to the tradition of young domestic servants and apprentices being given the day off to visit their mother and family.

But over the years,  it has increasingly being called Mother’s Day. It is traditionally a celebration to observe and celebrate mums, grandmothers and step-mums with flowers, breakfast in bed, gifts and cards.

When Mom Lives Far Away

Flowers and presents on the table facing Swan River view

I live away from my sons, but I am fortunate to receive flowers, presents, personalised card, messages and calls to let me know they are thinking of me and that makes me feel super special.

Countries have their particular ways of celebrating Mother’s Day. There’s a lot you can do, but whatever way you choose to honour your Mom, the time you spend, and the connection you make with each other is what matters most. 

How do you plan to spoil your Mom on Mother’s Day? Does your Mum live close to you? If you or your mom is not in any of the above countries, we would love to hear how your country celebrate it. Please share.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms!

Luci

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